Articles Benefits Spotlight

COVR Mentoring: On Your Road to Triumph

When you ask a successful person what assisted them on their road to triumph, many of them will state that they had a mentor. A mentor is an adviser offering guidance from their lessons learned. A person that is being mentored is called a mentee. I have been both during my professional life.

As a mentor, I have provided informational sessions answering numerous questions from those seeking to be professional readers. I even created a class on this subject for those wishing to make that move. I have assisted in increasing the mentee’s self esteem, business acumen and marketing skills. For others, it was short term advice for handling issues with clients, setting up a booth at an expo, or giving them valuable contact information.

When you ask a successful person what assisted them on their road to triumph, many of them will state that they had a mentor. A mentor is an adviser offering guidance from their lessons learned. A person that is being mentored is called a mentee. I have been both during my professional life.

As a mentor, I have provided informational sessions answering numerous questions from those seeking to be professional readers. I even created a class on this subject for those wishing to make that move. I have assisted in increasing the mentee’s self esteem, business acumen and marketing skills. For others, it was short term advice for handling issues with clients, setting up a booth at an expo, or giving them valuable contact information.

Some of the mentees I worked with were for short periods of time, and for others I spent many hours with. The type of mentoring I offered depended on the personality of the person and how much free time that I had available. Mentoring several people at once, as I have done, does take up a lot of time. Sometimes I stopped mentoring a person if they were rude or unappreciative. Many people out there that want assistance forget that manners are important. Thanking a mentor, even for a quick one answer call, is extremely important. Gratitude and appreciation will keep your access open to the mentor.

As a mentee, I have been very lucky to have such professional and well-known people to lean on during new learning curves, to run marketing ideas past them and to test my products on them. Some of my mentors offered quick informational sessions where I was prepared with a list of questions, and others were available on standby for quick tips and advice. Each person that has assisted me was gracious and I thanked them profusely for their time. They were told how appreciative I was of their time.

I have found mentoring others to be challenging, fun and also inspiring. As a mentee, I have received invaluable advice from those that forged pathways. Since I have been on both sides of mentoring, I would like to share tips with you as you search for a mentor or if you would like to become a mentor.

Mentee Advice

  1. When asking a person to be your mentor or for an informational session, be polite and undemanding. Calling a person for assistance is nerve wracking, but you are asking them for a favor. Be gracious.
  2. Be courteous of your mentor’s time. Be on time for your session. Mentors are busy too. Their open time slots may not be the most convenient for you, but they are giving up their time to help you.
  3. Be prepared with your questions for your sessions. When a mentor answers you with what worked for them, don’t state “that sounds stupid.” The mentor won’t tell you something unless it worked!
  4. Make sure you THANK them for helping you. Mentors are not required to help you, but they did so thank them.
  5. If a person you contact to be your mentor states they cannot take on additional mentees at this time, still thank them. Do not yell at them or pester them. Mentoring is time-consuming. If they have another opening, they will think of you above the person that yelled at them.

Mentor Advice

  1. The person asking for your assistance or mentoring is asking you because they RESPECT you. Be gracious with them if you cannot add them to your roster of mentees.
  2. The mentee might not know the insider lingo or may not understand your business fully. State what you can help them with and what you cannot help them with. This eliminates time wasting for both of you.
  3. Be on time for your sessions.
  4. You do not have to give away your business or marketing plan. Boundaries are healthy so encourage the mentee to learn their way.

COVR does have a wonderful mentoring program. Please participate either by volunteering as a mentor for those that are learning the business, or by calling to arrange your own information session as a mentee. Get on the road to triumph with COVR behind you.

© 2015, Melinda Carver, reprinted with permission.  Melinda Carver is a psychic medium and radio host with her own line of magical products – Melinda’s Positive Products. www.psychicmelinda.webs.com